Financing

We aim to break down any cost issues that our patients may have if they are considering LASIK eye surgery. Our LASIK center goes way beyond what other centers do to help our patients overcome this affordability issue. If cost is something that has been holding you back from vision correction you should really contact us as soon as possible to set up a consultation. Ophthalmology Associates offers 0% financing, on approved credit with low fixed monthly payments, no down payment and no pre-payment penalty.

Cataract patients now have an option to see at both near and far distances after cataract surgery! Individuals suffering from cataracts previously had only a mono-focal lens implant option after surgery. NEW premium lens implant technology can now decrease dependence on glasses after surgery. If you are seeking the ReZoom or ReSTOR® IOL lens options in St. Louis the doctors at Ophthalmology Associates can help you decide which option is right for you! Ophthalmology Associates also has an accommodating IOL option known as the Crystalens®.

Find out if you can be a LASIK candidate. Take our LASIK Surgery St. Louis self-evaluation test and you will be evaluated and contacted by one of our LASIK coordinators to discuss your candidacy. If you meet the requirements of our test we will suggest an in person pre-operative eye exam. This eye exam is a complete eye health eye exam and will most likely be one of the most thorough eye exams of your life. We obviously take your vision very seriously at Ophthalmology Associates.

Pediatric Ophthalmology



Amblyopia

Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is closely related to strabismus. Children learn to suppress double vision so effectively that the deviating eye gradually loses vision.

It may be necessary to patch the good eye and wear glasses before treating the strabismus. Amblyopia does not occur when alternate eyes deviate, and adults do not develop amblyopia.

Strabismus is often treated by surgically adjusting the tension on the eye muscles. The goal of surgery is to get the eyes close enough to perfectly straight that it is hard to see any residual deviation. Surgery usually improves the conditions though the results are rarely perfect. Results are usually better in young children. Surgery can be done with local anesthesia in some adults, but requires general anesthesia in children, usually as an outpatient. Prisms and Botox injections of the eye muscles are alternatives to surgery in some cases. Eye exercises are rarely effective.

Eyeglasses for Infants and Children

Prescriptions for glasses can be measured in even the youngest and most uncooperative children by using a special instrument called a retinoscope to analyze light reflected through the pupil from the back of the eye.

Most lenses today, especially for children, are made of plastic, which is stronger and lighter than glass. It is a good idea to get a scratch-resistant coating on plastic lenses. Children can be rough with glasses and plastic lenses scratch easily.

Color tints or tints that respond to changes in light can be incorporated into lenses. For children, the tint should not be so dark that the child has trouble seeing indoors.

Frames come in all shapes and sizes. Choose one that fits comfortably but securely. There are devices available to keep glasses in place, a good idea for active children and young children with flat nasal bridges. Cable temples, which wrap around the back of the ears, are good for toddlers. Infants may require a strap across the top and back of the head instead of earpieces. Flexible hinges hold glasses in position, allow the glasses to "grow" with the child, and prevent the side arms from being broken.

Children often do not like their glasses although the prescription is correct. Distraction, positive reinforcement, and bribery help children get in the habit of wearing glasses. If all else fails, your ophthalmologist can prescribe an eye drop that blurs vision when the glasses are not in place. This often overcomes the child's initial resistance to wearing glasses.

Strabismus

Strabismus refers to misaligned eyes. If the eyes turn inward (crossed), it is called esotropia. If the eyes turn outward (wall-eyed), it is called exotropia. Or, one eye can be higher than the other which is called hypertropia (for the higher eye) or hypotropia (for the lower eye). Strabismus can be subtle or obvious, intermittent (occurring occasionally), or constant. It can affect one eye only or shift between the eyes.

Strabismus usually begins in infancy or childhood. Some toddlers have accommodative esotropia. Their eyes cross because they need glasses for farsightedness. But most cases of strabismus do not have a well-understood cause.

It seems to develop because the eye muscles are uncoordinated and do not move the eyes together. Acquired strabismus can occasionally occur because of a problem in the brain, an injury to the eye socket, or thyroid eye disease.

When young children develop strabismus, they typically have mild symptoms. They may hold their heads to one side if they can use their eyes together in that position. Or, they may close or cover one eye when it deviates, especially at first. Adults, on the other hand, have more symptoms when they develop strabismus. They have double vision and may lose depth perception. At all ages, strabismus is disturbing. Studies show school children with significant strabismus have self-image problems.